Loading…
avatar for Jeppe Moulijn

Jeppe Moulijn

The work of Jeppe Moulijn can be described as expressive, rich in instrumental color, detailed and accessible without deliberately aiming at it. In many of his works the human voice and poetry play an important role. Sometimes his work touches on current events in, for example, MusiXbox, a music story for children about a boy who unexpectedly finds the key to his musical fantasy in his computer games or in Ishmael and Isaac, a choral work in which the biblical schism between the Jewish and the Palestinian people are covered. But above all, Moulijn's work is permeated with his years of experience as a conductor, and with it a musical tradition from Bach to the present.

Jeppe Moulijn studied composition with Diderik Wagenaar at the Royal Conservatory in The Hague. He received instrumentation lessons from Louis Andriessen and music theory by Theo Verbeij. He often takes on commissioned works:  For the International Viola Congress in Porto (2014), he wrote the piece "Secret Society" for 4 solo violas and massed ensemble. 

In Moulijn's work one can find echoes of late romanticism, and influences from composers such as John Adams, Takemitsu, Adès, Britten and film music. From this he distilled a personal style. It is important that he does not fall back into nostalgic clichés, but that it is lucid and well-constructed. It is not uncommon to use old polyphonic techniques such as the passacaglia. In a recent piece like Secret Society, you also find elements of guided improvisation and eastern music. Moulijn likes to describe himself as an 'intelligent romantic'.

In 2012 he recorded two works with the East Netherlands Symphony Orchestra on a super audio CD for the label Aliud. In 2019, his biggest work so far will be Voyage to Creation premiere. He is currently working on a sonata for piano four hands for the piano duo Martijn and Stefan Blaak.
 

At IVC2018, Jeppe Moulijn is a member of the jury for the 4Viola compostition contest, presenting their findings on Saturday morning Nov. 24th.